In DIY, Essential Oils, Evergreen, Homemaking, Summer

Easy Homemade Deodorant

Eliminate toxins and stay clean and fresh with an affordable easy homemade deodorant. Best part is, you probably already have the ingredients in your pantry.

The Hubs and I have been using homemade deodorant for over three years, and guess what? We don’t stink!

I’ll admit it’s no clinical strength deodorant. I used to go days without re-applying that stuff and still be stink free! (Before you judge, it’s important you know I used to be a backpacking guide through the mountains for weeks at a time during the muggy summer months. Showers weren’t always an option, clinical strength deodorant was!)

Is Deodorant Bad For You?

In a word? Yes. But let’s get real, the ingredients in those mainstream deodorants are less than stellar. I’m one for doing my utmost to lead a non-chemical laden lifestyle. That goes for what I put in and on my body.

Is Sweating Good for You?

You betchya! Sweating is actually very healthy. Our skin is our largest organ, and an integral part of the body’s ability to detox. Antiperspirants hinder (and damage) the body’s ability to get this job done.

Why is Deodorant Harmful?

Below is a list of ingredients that are in the deodorant I used to use. Listed next to the ingredients are the dangers those ingredients pose to my health:

  • Fragrance – Scores an 8 on EWG.org. Ecotoxicology (harmful to our environment), causes allergies/immunotoxicity (damaging to our immune system), irritation to skin, eyes or lungs, and organ system toxicity (non-reproductive).
  • Petrolatum – Carcinogenic (cancer causing), organ system toxicity (non-reproductive), neurotoxicity (causes damage to the brain and/or peripheral nervous system) and bioaccumulation (not always a bad thing when it comes to vitamins and minerals, but when toxic chemicals are absorbed and build up in our bodies faster than we’re able to neutralize and excrete them, this can cause harmful side effects).
  • Cyclopentasiloxane – Carcinogenic, ecotoxicology, endocrine disruption (interferes with hormone production and regulation), organ system toxicity (non-reproductive), neurotoxicity and bioaccumulation.
  • Dimethicone – Ecotoxicology and organ system toxicity (non-reproductive).

Call me crazy, but I don’t want to risk all of the above just so I don’t sweat a little, especially when I can make my own with four simple ingredients!

…and the bonus is, you probably have everything needed in your pantry!”

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Easy Homemade Deodorant in a Jar with Plastic Lid off to the Side

Easy Homemade Deodorant


  • Author: Full of Days
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 1 cup deodorant
  • Category: Personal Care

Description

Eliminate toxins and stay clean and fresh with an affordable easy homemade deodorant. Best part is, you probably already have the ingredients in your pantry.


Ingredients


Instructions

  1. Add coconut oil into a small glass jar and place the jar in a shallow pot of boiling water.  Once coconut oil is melted, turn off heat.
  2. Add baking soda and stir to combine.
  3. Add bentonite clay (if using) and stir to combine.
  4. Add arrowroot or cornstarch and stir to combine.
  5. Add essential oils, if using, stir to combine and place jar in the refrigerator.
  6. Stir frequently (every 10 minutes or so) to prevent oil separation.
  7. Add a lid and store in your bathroom. Use your fingers and apply as you would normal deodorant.

Notes

  • If you’re used to mainstream deodorants (particularly those containing aluminum or antiperspirants), it may take a few weeks before your body adjusts to this new deodorant. Once your body regulates, you should be able to go a full 24 hours “stink free“.
  • This recipe can be customized for your skin type/sensitivity. Using the whole 1/4 cup baking soda may cause skin irritation, decrease baking soda and increase bentonite clay until you find what works best for you. (You can also increase the cornstarch or arrowroot powder if you don’t have bentonite clay.)
  • It’s my suggestion to cut the recipe by 1/4, making small batches, until you find the right combination for your skin type.
  • For sensitive skin – Replace half the baking soda with bentonite clay and use lavender essential oil.
  • Essential oils are amazing products and we use them on a daily basis. Be sure your oils are 100% pure and know proper dilution ratios.
  • If you’re used to mainstream deodorants (particularly those containing aluminum), it may take a few weeks before your body adjusts to this new deodorant. Once your body regulates, you should be able to go a full 24 hours “stink free“.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: N/A
  • Calories: N/A
  • Sugar: N/A
  • Sodium: N/A
  • Fat: N/A
  • Saturated Fat: N/A
  • Unsaturated Fat: N/A
  • Trans Fat: N/A
  • Carbohydrates: N/A
  • Fiber: N/A
  • Protein: N/A
  • Cholesterol: N/A
full-of-days_pinterest_deodorant_2

Additional Tips for Homemade Deodorant

  • Because the melting point of coconut oil is 76 degrees F, if your bathroom tends to get hot (especially in the summertime), your deodorant may melt or be soft (even low 70’s can make it soft). It will work just the same, but you may need to give it a quick stir before applying to make sure no separation of ingredients has occurred. Alternatively, you can store the deodorant in the refrigerator if you prefer a solid deodorant.
  • To fix runny deodorant, try adding an extra tablespoon or two of arrowroot or cornstarch to try and thicken it up a bit. As a last resort, store it in the refrigerator.
  • If you’re used to mainstream deodorants (particularly those containing aluminum or antiperspirants), it may take a few weeks before your body adjusts to this new deodorant. Once your body regulates, you should be able to go a full 24 hours “stink free“.
  • This recipe can be customized for your skin type/sensitivity. Using the whole 1/4 cup baking soda may cause skin irritation, decrease baking soda and increase bentonite clay until you find what works best for you. (You can also increase the cornstarch or arrowroot powder if you don’t have bentonite clay.)
  • It’s my suggestion to cut the recipe by 1/4, making small batches, until you find the right combination for your skin type.
  • For sensitive skin – Replace half the baking soda with bentonite clay and use lavender essential oil.
  • Essential oils are amazing products and we use them on a daily basis. Be sure your oils are 100% pure and know proper dilution ratios.
  • If you’re used to mainstream deodorants (particularly those containing aluminum), it may take a few weeks before your body adjusts to this new deodorant. Once your body regulates, you should be able to go a full 24 hours “stink free“.

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Showing 18 comments
  • Tracey
    Reply

    It’s a whole new ball game making things from scratch living in an RV but we did it! At least with this deodorant recipe:) Easy enough to make in an RV! Still love this stuff!

    • Kelsey Steffen
      Kelsey Steffen
      Reply

      Yay! Great for even the smallest of spaces! 😉

  • Beth
    Reply

    So I FINALLY made this deodorant and now that I have I’m wondering why I took soooooo long!!!!! This is amazing!! It works as well as the store bought without all the “bad for you” stuff in it. So easy and economical to make!!! This will be my deodorant for life now!!! Thanks Kelsey!!

    • Kelsey Steffen
      Kelsey Steffen
      Reply

      Awesome Beth! I’m so glad it works for you! When I first started using this deodorant, I found I had to reapply after about 12 hours. But now that I’ve been using it for over two years I can go a full day without any “scent issues”. 😉

  • Angela Marie
    Reply

    I love making my own deodorant! James thinks I am crazy still about it. I made some that had a more “manly” scent with tea tree, cedarwood oils, but he won’t try it LOL. Thanks for this recipe! I will have to try this one next time!

    • Kelsey Steffen
      Kelsey Steffen
      Reply

      Keep with it! Jason was really skeptical at first, but eventually saw the all around benefits to our entire life! He realizes the money we save by making DIY items, how much better our food tastes now that it’s “real” and the value in doing these things ourselves!

    • Jason Steffen
      Jason Steffen
      Reply

      Angela, thank you for chiming in! Have James read this post from a former skeptic…uh…me!

      • Angela Marie
        Reply

        Thanks guys! I will share with him that post! I look forward to following your blogging adventures!

  • Lauren
    Reply

    Have you ever tried food grade diatomaceous earth instead of baking soda for sensitive skin? Does the coconut oil stain shirts?

    • Kelsey Steffen
      Kelsey Steffen
      Reply

      I haven’t used DE in deodorant Lauren, let me know how it works if you give it a try! And no, we haven’t noticed any staining from the coconut oil, you use such a tiny amount and it’s absorbed very quickly.

    • Kelsey Steffen
      Kelsey Steffen
      Reply

      I just found a recipe that uses Diotomaceous Earth! It’s to be swapped out for the baking soda since some people have sensitivities to the baking soda. Use 1/4 cup DE and up the coconut oil by 1-2 tablespoons (or until desired consistency is reached) if needed.

  • Beth
    Reply

    So if the essential oils are for fragrance only..do I have to use them?

    • Kelsey Steffen
      Kelsey Steffen
      Reply

      Not at all Beth! Should work just fine without them!

  • Heather
    Reply

    Thanks for sharing this! I like that you give a corn free option, arrowroot, since many people are allergic or sensitive to corn! 🙂 I love using pure Essential Oils for supporting the body naturally! Love removing as many toxins as possible! Easy recipe even for beginners! ♡

    • Kelsey Steffen
      Kelsey Steffen
      Reply

      Yes! The brand of cornstarch I use is organic and GMO-free, but the arrowroot is a good sub!

  • Tammy
    Reply

    What essential oil do you recommend? Is it just about smell or are there health benefits?

    • Kelsey Steffen
      Kelsey Steffen
      Reply

      There are many health benefits to essential oils, but when it comes to my deodorant, I’m strictly going with scent preferences. I prefer citrus tones (said to promote focus and energy), but some may prefer lavender (which would add a soothing effect for sensitive skin). You may also consider dividing a batch into smaller jars so each member can choose their own scent preference (the man of the house may not want to walk around smelling like a flower!).

      • Tammy
        Reply

        Thanks Kelsey!

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